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20130224
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making to the bowel and this is all going to put more sales in the regional economy and again there is so much business activity. and we are blessed with just being in this part of the country and the world. i'm very interested in what we are going to hear from our speakers this morning to sort off guide us through this year. now before we get to our program please join me in thanking the organizations and people who made this possible. and you can clap now for awful them but -- this event is jointly presented by san francisco business times and our partner, title sponsor corn irand carey commercial new mark, night, frank. and we are going it hear from dan clef man and dan class man some 14 year ago really came up with this idea, we sat down over lunch and there was another person involved allen cline knelt and which came up with this idea and so i have to give dan much much credit for that. (applause). . very much so. and in 2012, cornish and carey, dominated the area of commercial real estate with over $6 billion in leasing and sales transactions so very good there. and you are soon
and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success notes the road that leads to trouble or and is the one of the 3 san franciscans who went there know we mu
in the valley, sacramento, or in d.c., that would strengthen the innovation economy? >> i could go on about immigration and corporate tax policy reform, but i am a researcher, so i will not. >> and we have seven minutes. >> mayor lee said it perfectly. the fundamental thing that companies are looking for is to be engaged in the process. we use a term in computing called agile. we look for more ability and the possibility to work with us, iterate in the process, rather than what we often see as we call the waterfall, take-it-or- leave-it. flexibility and agility is what is most important. >> mayor lee? >> i have always thought of our city as being the gateway to the rest of the world. i have often talked, with companies, i want to be with you when you turn the corner. we want to be the city that treats international markets for your products. i do not know if you know this but we have 70 counsel general offices in san francisco, the highest number outside of washington, d.c. we want to make sure that our companies know we are not just in it for san francisco, the region. we have to tap inter
are going to talk about silicon valley and the bay area innovation to the economy today. as you look at the panel, talking about the silicon valley, we have the mayor of san francisco. it will come into perspective, that when you have a giant like ibm anchor here in the valley, you are seeing in between companies like google and apple and facebook with incredible growth. in san francisco, mayor lee has welcomed to the fold in twitter, zynga, companies that are into cloud computing, hiring lots of people that not only want to live and work in the valley but recognize san francisco as being part of the valley. we are, indeed, fortunate, from san jose to san francisco, to be part of the innovation economy. we are finally seeing once again california's innovation is leading us out of the last three years of recession. i do not know about you but i am pretty tired of the recession. i made a statement several years ago that it was about time for an adjustment to the economy, things were too expensive, overheated. two years after that, i regretted making that comment. it was great to hear j
roofers and home inspector and is then that has a booying fantastic on the overall economy having said that i'm not living with my head in the sand here i recognize that a lot of markets are still suffering a little bit and this graph show you's you the change of value in home price from their local market peak to where they are at present the case sowler composite and san francisco is halfway through the pack there down to about 33% and so whole values are still off from where they were before but if you look at where we are from the low point until where we are today, san francisco is looking a little bit better and oakland is not a member city and they randomly take 20 cities that are plead broadly representative of the housing market and san francisco is the second line on here and posted as one of the naysest paces of recovery and so we get some help from residential construction and we also get help from securelier spending this is what i'm showing here and this is the debt service ratio and it's an interesting concept if says if you add up my mortgage payment and car payment and
the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be renowned for. and those of you that work in our bars and clubs, i want to make sure that we are trading the kind of destinations that we look forward to
economy. we in this room and many of us working together took on the story changes for our city some of which have vexed for years >> years. i'm proud that together we through innovation and we foerjd our way ahead. to the city commissioners and to the department heads and to our friends in the business, labor you think non-profit and other communities who spent countless hours with us in negotiations and to the great people of san francisco who rewarded us with your support at ballet in san francisco thank you, very much. together we're putting san francisco back on the right track and building a solid foundation for all our residents. my fellow san francisco's we're living in a time of astonishing innovation and unlimited process we're driving that innovation and for or against the future right here right now not just for san francisco but for the whole world. within the lab of our technologies we're developing techniques will will save lives. to our market district we're providing the world with tools to live in the chewing print with 3-d or even topple dock - we're fashioned ou
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going forward. msk(music) >> the bay area knows the orchestra. you maybe take things for granted a little bit. that is simply not the case will go on the road. the audiences go crazy. they don't see vitality like this on stage. we are capable of conveying joy when we play. msk(music) >> any performance that we do, that a program, that will be something on the program that you haven't heard before. string orchestra repertoire is pretty small. i used to be boxed into small repertoire. i kept constantly looking for new repertoire and commissioning new arrangements. if you look at the first
economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can show that drug use rates are quite similar in all different ethnic communities and african-americans are 13 times greater likelihood of being convicted of a felony of simple possession. then of course there's also the savings that we could experience, nonpartisan, independent legislative analyst office has determined that there would be $159 million annually of savings at the county level, plus another $65 million annually in savings at the state level. and our bill would direct a portion of that savings to drug treatment programs so that we can, like these 13 other states, have better outcomes, safer communities. i of course have to thank the sponsors of our bill, and we have a number of them, the h.l.u. which has been a champion and the drug policy alliance as we
in the economy for the recovery to keep going. and i think that legislation will be helpful that way. as was mentioned earlier, planning, staff, any way has recommended doubling the entitlement period from three years to 6 years, but the planning commission has yet to actually act on that. when they put that to them in 2009, the planning commission turned that down. so, i don't know yet, whether or not they are going to also extend the planning entitlement period as we have done but this will help our customers definitely in terms of the building permit process. >> i think that the only other item that i wanted to mention to you is that as panel i just mentioned on the hacto, that is healthy air, clean, vehicles. we are in the process as we have been actually for some time now requesting a waiver, the legislation contains language that enables the department in order to fulfill its duties to be granted a waiver. and it has taken the department of environmental a little time to establish a process, they now have a process so that there is a submission, again, of our request for the wa
, the economy will stop. we did a major outreach. we trained an outreach team, who went to every community meeting, to educate people on how bad the crisis was. not only did i tell people that we'd have to raise rates, i told them we'd have to tear up the city to repair this infrastructure. man: you can't simply say, "i won't use any water, it's too expensive." we have about 25% of our population that's at or below the poverty line, so you have to look at rate structures that are tiered so the people can pay their bills. franklin: we would love to have something like 75% federal money. we do get some federal aid and we are thankful, but on the other hand, we're paying for this primarily with new rates. we have increased our rates to among the highest in america. but not nearly as much as if we hadn't passed a one-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have cle
. that is a gift economy. it is predicated on the idea that some things have an unconditional value. you cannot put a price on it. we just said, everything is a gift in our city. you cannot buy or sell anything. there is no advertising. you are not surrounded by this nattering pandemonium of commercial messages, which is so relentless. and lo and behold, we discovered, had a certain point in a community, when everyone is giving, -- people began to have experiences that were revelatory. they began to feel like they were in touch with that unconditional reality, which perhaps in their youth they identified as their life's goal. it creates a world in which -- just saturated with meaningful encounter. and it seems to have been contagious because people have now left our event and they have left our world and they continued to do activities. they did not go to a festival and say their appetite. they came back and tried to change their world. that is why we are starting this burning man project. we think there is a law that we can do together. try it sometime. try living for eight days without buying, se
of burning man in gerlach. the school is closing down because they do not have any kids. the economy has been based on mining. there are some tourists that come through. hunters. some of our people come through and leave money in their wake. a little town like that does not know how to make money. but they have learned in certain ways. we have made significant charitable contributions. i do not want to great -- take much credit for this, but we are helping to keep them alive. the thing about our event, we do not do commercial things at the event. it spreads out the economic development to our neighbors. the piutes down the road are now doing in the in taco stands now and we know them. there was the day when we were considered scary, coming from san francisco, you know. it is much easier to break into a big city. but we are well accepted and respected
economy. our customer, i can completely agree with what shannon said in terms of our business objective, so to speak, is to empower entrepreneurs and innovators, to create jobs. that's a metric of success, not revenue generated per data set or some other per ifervance metric. the other piece of that looking back to the example of weather and gps, my monetization, is that together they contribute $100 billion to the american economy last year. last year alone from just those two data liberations. so, that is the way in which we are approaching from a strategy perspective, the ultimate impact to our customers. >> one super quick. one thing the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities have smaller budgets. having a structure to support all this open data takes a lot of money. so, when these small cities are thinking about this, they should think about a way of somehow equalizing because they are putting into having these open data team, right? so, what does make sense? this is kind of an open question to get your point of view. >> do y
support it? do you think it is the right way to go? >> let me tell you, right now our future economy is dependent upon of high-speed rail. let me tell you why. 1/3 of the traffic at our san francisco airport is due to the commute between los angeles and san francisco. we cannot expand the runways at the airport. we have agreed we would never be permitted to do that even if we wanted to. we're not going to be able to expand our airport. our new economy is dependent upon international flights increasing. we cannot get more international flights into san francisco unless we move the l.a.-san francisco commute off of the airlines and on to high-speed rail. 1/3, that is what we're betting on. if we can get high-speed rail out there and move that off, we will include -- increase our air flights. that is our theory. i believe strongly in that. we have 10 of the largest cities in california in agreement with us that we will be the northern terminal for high-speed rail reading l.a. and san francisco. a lot more details to be had. palo alto wants us to work with them on the first phase. we wil
in time and it may be as the economy picks up that we will look at perhaps, the funding, but also look at whether or not, in the appropriate situation whether that can be expanded to other than small property owners in certain situations. i would not say, necessarily, that 308 turk would necessarily be a candidate. but other prompts may be. that would definitely be something to be looked at. >> that would be great and maybe we could get together proposals around that. i think that it is a benefit. to have these buildings available. there are some of our lowest cost housing. but they really need to, we need to continue to focus on bringing the ha bitbility up. >> and the bliet cases that are very difficult cases for us to resolve so if that became available in the future it would be most helpful. >> as i remember it, the old programs, the surf program was funded by dbi and it was something that got... it was a commission action that dedicated that money to single family home owners. so it did not have to be that way. but we change that had three years ago when it was taken out of the co
they have to go elsewhere. and when they go elsewhere, jobs go elsewhere. your entire economy begins to suffer with the lack of clean water. narrator: while the water infrastructure provides for our health, safety, and economy, a growing concern is that the value society derives from water has not traditionally been reflected in the price we pay for water. man: when you take a look at how much people pay for water, as a percentage of median household income, it's usually less than 1%. and when you compare that to how much we pay for electricity and gas, cable tv, and internet, the bottom line is, in the united states, we don't pay a heck of a lot for water. curtis: at an average cost of about $2.50 for 1,000 gallons of tap water, it is a great bargain. garvin: but the rates that are being charged for water are insufficient to replace existing systems and to expand existing systems. narrator: because original infrastructure investments were frequently subsidized by the federal government, water pricing was often calculated without accounting for the initial cost to build the sy
the ability to get to really deliver on the promises of a shared economy for everyone. and guess what? we're going to be on the move. we're going to get the job done. this is no longer talk about wishes of things to happen. we actually have the ability to get it done and whether it's at the port, at the housing authority, at the city administrator's office of public works, at the puc, it's no longer about the lack of resources. it's about the will to get everybody included and get jobs to everybody and get the condition for people to succeed. so, on this day -- (applause) >> it's not just a celebration. let's us unite and get this job done for everybody. let's make sure we translate promises into real programs and reality so we can have more and more of our youth say to us, i'm going to be here, i'm going to get the jobs, i'm going to invest in myself, and then i'm going to be the mayor of san francisco. thank you very much for being here today and celebrating. (applause) >> and as mayors do, got a proclamation. al, with all your great leadership at the culture center and your support, th
permits in hand, because of the economy. within weeks of the twitter deal being signed an legislation going forward to exempt them from the payroll tax, the investors of the 550-unit building released their contractors to go to work. that is why you see three cranes on that site. this is the investor confidence that we are now producing because of one decision that was so remarkably regurgitating to run market street. and then you have seen other things, donnie's cafe relocating. zendesk. even before that income was signed with twitter, zendesk moved in right in the middle of market street. there are more coming in. there are three property owners who are about to change ownership in mid market because of the signal they feel. market street will change but all this activity. investor confidence. i want to come back to that game as to why i want to continue to manage the city in an economically-recoverable way. we still have a lot of work to do because, with 8% unemployment rate, that is 7000 people who have yet to get jobs, and they are looking desperately for them. we have got a huge
business. when the economy is strong, all lenders are shopping for transactions. in times are tough on credit, you want to rely on those deeper liberation ships with your lender. you want to develop a relationship with a lender. it is the case where you want to open up an account, while to have another bank services that you want to have a relationship with your lender with it because when you go to them for any loan requests, you want them to know about your business and feel like they are a partner of yours, not just that you are shopping them. if you are shopping, you are just looking for the best deal from them, rather than a long- term relationship. >> i want to thank everyone for coming. hopefully, you have all signed up for our updates. we are going to be hosting these on a regular basis. the next two coming up will focus on becoming a government contractor, how your small business can partner with the government. the next one will also be on how to grain your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits available with that. for non-profit, charitable organizations
, but these three principles. mastery, been technically proficient in your area. it is economy, where you are able to take initiative, operate within a zone that has been broad enough for you to use your creativity. it is purpose. purpose on behalf of the people of san francisco. i think all of the nominees that we are honoring tonight are motivated by these principles. i want to thank the department heads who have employed them. they allow these people to flourish, to be an autonomous, and move forward in a way that benefits the people of san francisco. we think the best and brightest should be in city government. the people here tonight are proof that they are. finally, i want to mention a very meaningful thing for me to be here tonight on the night we are giving a lifetime of work to ed harrington. [applause] when i arrived in san francisco coming out of state employment some six years ago or so, ed was very generous in giving me advice. to say -- i will call. why are we doing this? who can i ask this question of? if i think it may have political implications or just to bounce it off him, he al
of these events is a loss for san francisco culture and our economy. it will take the right perspective of leadership from the mayor's office to make those events be able to happen. >> [unintelligible] [applause] >> i am very sorry that we lost some of these events. i'm sure they added to cultural diversity. i do know that looking at the board, there are 280 events in a given year. street fairs, hip-hop, promotional events. there is only so much that we can do. we have to make sure that every event has enough personnel to keep it safe. be it the security plan, officers, or police officers. that is one thing i failed to mention earlier. paramount to training for an event that has enough people to prevent anything disastrous from occurring, you never know what can be prevented, because you never know what you can stop from happening. you never know if people have enough resources to make sure they do not have a problem. >> down to the last few questions, we are running out of time. >> let's see how quick we can get to it. >> ok. >> we will be really fast. i commend the police department.
in the city is continuing to increase as the economy has been improving. $300,000 in increased revenue from additional use of our fields and facilities. $350,000 in increased permits for special events and then $300,000 in additional revenue from the newly negotiated lease for the outside lands festival. stadium rentals is outside of the revenue that we received from the 49ers. it's for rentals of the parking lot, and for the stadium. we are budgeting $500,000 in each of the next two fiscal years in playoff revenue that we have received from the san francisco 49ers this year from the 2012 playoff game. $240,000 in '13-14 in revenue that we received from the pga tour to back fill the revenue we lose when we close harding park for the schwab cup tournament, which is this coming november. $400,000 in additional revenue from the open space fund. and then as i mentioned the last time i was here, $200,000 in additional revenue from continued philanthropic support to the department. we have been very successful, our partnerships division has been very successful in the last several years in gettin
it happen for more people. we are growing our economy now. we are creating international markets for our san francisco-made products. we are strongly encouraging our neighborhoods to be clear and accessible to different cultures. and when they are, they will make things that we have never seen before. discover things we haven't had. and then we have international forums upon which to talk about it, brag about it. communicate and to exchange. whether education or to sell products and services. this makes the world even better and more closely tied. i am proud that we have the celebration that we celebrate lunar new year. and explain every year what the differences might mean with the different zodiac animals we celebrate. but in each and every one of those there is a lesson of life to see and visit and compare ourselves to and improve upon. and i would say that san francisco with the help of the people on the stage. as well as you in the audience, you are always helping to improve the city for the next generation. i look forward to 2013 being not only the mini-dragon, but the year that we get
of our time to chinese investors and really an international economy but we are looking at not just across the country but to invest and -- in the bay area and it's not goal of -- 50% there and to ed we are a region and many of these companys are going to be make this horizontal and vertical -- chinese investors in the entire bay area and so they have to have it's a different game. and you know, texans have to live there. the reality is that this is one of the most beautiful places with the best whrr and -- [inaudible] company that is going to for tech assistance on your software and you get somebody in india well they are actually -- because oakland they are putting a call center in oakland to get a quicker turn around and -- in many languages and that is an innovation because of the diversity and depth of the talent in the bay area. >> prop 30 doesn't make economic development harder or is that an issue >>> well it may be a challenge for certain types of companies but i do think that our investments as mayor khan said increasing the quality of life here for the talented empl
, keeps those pesticides out, so if you're working on an economy of scale, you know, go with organic with the ones that have the highest levels of pesticides. our website has a link to those tips so i can show you where that would be. and now we're going to pop into the living room and talk about flame retardants which are an important issue for any firefighters who are working in the field because it's those burns that are going to create exposures, so as folks in the home are thinking about that, once they found that frequent hand washing can reduce the actual levels of these flame retardants because we touch them, they get on our hands, they're in household dusts and make their way into our bodies, so washing them off our hands can reduce exposures, using a vak coupe with a hepa filter and a big move that could come down the pike is going down to legacy fabrics like wool and fabric that don't require the use of these mraim retardants at all and burn much more slowly, this's been some amazing videos that you can look at that you may have seen that show the legacy fabrics burning so
is getting tagged, do you take into account the demographics in the sense of ethnicity or their economy of, you know, which type of --. >> we haven't to date, but we haven't really done that type of analysis. i think that's something we'd like to look at in the future in terms of getting down into the types of tagging. the graffiti i think it would be fair to say that the neighborhoods that have the highest incidents of graffiti tend to follow along where those business revitalization loans are or in areas of lower economic income, but we haven't done anything about ethnicity -- what you said. but we are actually looking at it. my director who just started with our branch last year is doing her master's in the area actually so that's something she wants to look at in the next few years. >> just wondering how long does it take to do an audit for a 4 by 4 block radius. >> it depends on how much graffiti they find, but the audit generally takes about 10 days. >> 20 to 25 neighborhoods, we can do about 2 1/2 neighborhoods a day. >> say that again? >> two neighborhoods, 2 1/2 neighborhoods
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 67 (some duplicates have been removed)